LYNN'S
SCULPTURED
BASKETS
Lynn is working on a basket while her Guide
Dog, Daretta, is by her side
I became totally blind at Age 6 due to
an accident.  In 1998 I learned how to
do coiled basketry.

I like to think of my basketry as a kind
of sculpture, where each individual
basket has its own unique style and
character. Color is meaningful to those
who can see, but for me I like to
concentrate on the form, texture and
style of the basket.

I enjoy experimenting with new
materials for my basketry creations.  
Thus far I've used pine needles from
various trees, round reed, sea grass,
corn husk, wild meadow grass, gourds
and emu eggs
.

Though there are many different materials available for making baskets,
my favorite is the long pine needle. It lends itself well to coiling, which is
the type of basketry I enjoy doing most.  I learned that I had to make
some adjustments in the standard coiling techniques so that I could work
entirely by touch. For example, instead of using all wet needles, I used dry
ones.  Rather than using raffia, I used waxed linen thread to sew my
baskets together.  

Today, years later, I still get great pleasure from this creative work. I
enjoy sitting under the pine trees with my Guide Dog as she watches over
me while I gather and sort fallen pine needles. Occasionally, I find a large
clump of needles which looks like a small broom. I marvel at the wonder
of nature. It is fun for me to be able to harvest fresh green young pine
needles from branches newly trimmed for fire prevention. Pine needles are
an interesting material because they vary in several ways. The young
green needles are supple, shiny, and fine, making them good material for
smaller baskets.

I have found the Torrey pine and black pine needles to be coarse, thick,
and strong. They can be used to form large sweeping angles that need
strength. The Ponderosa pine needle is a general, overall good material
for many coiled baskets. My favorite of all the pine needles, however, is
the Jeffrey pine. These long, strong, flexible needles can be tied, or bent
into all kinds of shapes and angles. All the pine needles I gather can be
dyed for color variation, waxed for hardness and sheen, and baked in
glycerin for limberness and gloss.

Pine needles are such a versatile material that it is always interesting to
work with them and quite rewarding to be able to create works of art from
nature's waste.  I do hope you enjoy my website.

EMAIL LYNN ABOUT HER BASKETS
VISITORS TO THIS PAGE
SINCE AUGUST 2009
Counter
LAST SITE UPDATE
nOVEMBER 11, 2015
IMPORTANT
PINE NEEDLE BASKETS SHOULD BE KEPT OUT
OF DIRECT SUN LIGHT AND AWAY FROM
HIGH HEAT SOURCES
Daretta passed away on April 26, 2015 after providing Lynn with more than
12 years of exemplary  service.  Please see the poem Lynn wrote
dedicated
to
Daretta on the ABOUT US PAGE.